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Tuesday, November 15, 2011

2nd Day back at work.

Yesterday was a bust, I had no energy and limped through the day as I attempted to go back to work after a week off post surgery (11/7/11).

Last week at a glance.
Monday
Surgery, I thought I would be getting an RFA procedure but going in they informed me it could either be RFA/ or / Microwave. When I woke up sore throat and all (incubation) with more IV's than I started off with I found out that the doctors did a Microwave procedure on only one nodule they think the other might be left over scar tissue from the wedge resection of 2009. I went home high as a Kite that night in the dark, in the rain with a nervous chauffeur (thank you morphine).

Tuesday
Sore as if I was still playing football going through preseason (abs and back were really sore), also deep breaths hurt. Lots of naps.

Wednesday
Rested most of the day, soreness decreased, took off bandage on my back (it stayed 12 hours longer than it should have), showered and I can't really see the incision from the Microwave.

Thursday
Resting, soreness lessening, breathing is getting better.

Friday
Repeat of Thursday Saturday Did the DFW lung Cancer walk, I walked the 1 mile course it hurt, I was tired very tired afterward. The event turnout was good...it has more participants each and every year.

4 comments:

  1. BTW, have you ever gotten any molecular testing done on the cancer to determine what mutation is driving it?

    There are mutation-targeted "inhibitor" drugs for EGFR and ALK (and maybe ROS1) that often work well for several months (sometimes years), and new experimental 2nd generation versions might work even better after that.

    (Another mutation, KRAS is not a good one to have, but can help guide treatment. Smokers are more likely to have the KRAS mutation driving their cancer, not many never-smokers have it.)

    Surgery and regular chemo (and some radiation) have a better chance of long-lasting 'cure', but it can be useful to know a mutation status ("molecular profile") just in case you need it someday.

    - CraiginPA on inspire.com
    - Stage IV mucinous BAC, responding very well to Xalkori (crizotinib)

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  2. It would be good to share your thoughts..there are many who are trying hard to ope up with life with so much of health issues and would get inspiration from whatever yo are doing.keep at it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This blog is great source of information which is very useful for me. Thank you very much.
    BEST INFORMATION ABOUT LUNG CANCER.

    ReplyDelete

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